GMO Food Crops

There are three primary categories in which GMO crops fall.  Let us summarize the categories here.

  • Intrinsic bug resistance
    • These strains of GMO foods are known as Bt strains, produced with genes from the bacteria  Bacillus thuringiensis.
    • Foods with this genetic modification produce proteins that cause bugs that eat the plant to burst.
    • Cotton and corn are the two Bt crops grown in the US.
  • Herbicide tolerance.
    • Known as Ht strains of GMO foods, the are modified primarily to tolerate glyphosphate pesticide so they are sprayed during growth.
    • Alfalfa, canola, cotton, corn, soybean and sugar beet are all current crops grown in the US.
  • Other traits-are dependent upon the type of food and trait desired
    • Canola, corn, papaya, potato, rose flowers, soybean, squash and tobacco are crops grown in the US.

More detail of each of these categories can be found at this site.

Are there any non-GMO crops of these foods left?

216px-feld_mit_reifer_baumwolleThat’s a good question!  As of 2014, 94% of the planted area of soybeans, 96% of cotton and 93% of corn were genetically modified varieties.

Please to not be amiss to notice how close we are coming to 100% on many of these large crops.  Applying this to daily life, this includes the soy sauce we eat and soy lecithin in many foods, the clothes we wear, and the foods we eat that contain high fructose corn syrup.  Does that leave any part of your life that isn’t covered?

7 thoughts on “GMO Food Crops

  1. You are right…it’s really hard to avoid them. We’ve pretty much stopped eating in regular restaurants. However, we’re lucky because we live in southern california where there are a few organic cafe’s in our town. Monsanto keeps getting more powerful and we keep getting sicker. Sorry to hear about your little one. It’s criminal that our food source is not safe for everyone.

  2. Thank you for giving us this very important information on the GMO. I am happy to have learnt about three primary categories in which GMO crops. It is interesting also to realize that all of these different category affect all aspects of our lives. You have very ably posed a very pertinent question, on whether there is any part of our lives that GMO does not intrude.

    I have appreciated a part of your post to have educated most of us on the alternative to GMO, i.e the Organic foods and where to source for the organic & bio foods.

    All in all a very concise , well written piece on GMO foods.

    Thank you.

  3. I will admit I am a little confused about GMO. I was completely against it for ages, but then I got to thinking that foods have been genetically modified for ages to get different varieties of fruits like seedless grapes and watermelons. Do these foods come under the same banner as technically being ‘genetically modified’, or are they different? Thanks for the info.

    1. Off the top of my head I couldn’t tell you for sure about those two foods but I’m thinking they may fall under selective breeding as opposed to GMO. I will look and find out

  4. Thank you for giving us this very important information on the GMO. I am happy to have learnt about three primary categories in which GMO crops. It is interesting also to realize that all of these different category affect all aspects of our lives. You have very ably posed a very pertinent question, on whether there is any part of our lives that GMO does not intrude.

    I have appreciated a part of your post to have educated most of us on the alternative to GMO, i.e the Organic foods and where to source for the organic & bio foods.

    All in all a very concise , well written piece on GMO foods.

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